Nov 212013
 

Re-posted from: http://cottagelabs.com/news/swordv2-and-dspace-new-release

We’re pleased to be able to say that in the last month we’ve been working hard to get the new version of the SWORDv2 java library and the related DSpace module which uses it up to release quality, in time for the DSpace 4.0 release which will be very soon.

For DSpace, this means we’ve achieved the following:

  • Some enhancements to the authentication/authorisation process, and more configurability
  • Proper support for the standard DSpace METS package, which had been omitted in the first version of SWORDv2 for various complicated reasons
  • Lots more configuration options, giving administrators the ability to fine tune their SWORDv2 endpoint
  • Improvements to how metadata is created, added and replaced and how those changes affect items in different parts of the workflow
  • Some general bug fixing and refactoring for better code

If you’re not a DSpace user, though, you can still benefit from the common java library; we’ve now released this properly through the maven central repository, and if you want to build your server environment from it, you can include it in your project as easily as:

    <dependency>
        <groupId>org.swordapp</groupId>
        <artifactId>sword2-server</artifactId>
        <version>1.0</version>
        <type>jar</type>
        <classifier>classes</classifier>
    </dependency>
    <dependency>
        <groupId>org.swordapp</groupId>
        <artifactId>sword2-server</artifactId>
        <version>1.0</version>
        <type>war</type>
    </dependency>

We hope you have fun with the new software. In the mean time, don’t forget that there’s lots of SWORD expertise hanging out on the sword-app-tech mailing list.

Richard Jones, 15th November 2013

Apr 022012
 

We’re pleased to advertise the following:

Dryad (http://datadryad.org) is a repository for data associated with scientific publications. As Dryad grows, it is becoming more important to use established standards for exchanging data with other systems. Although Dryad is built on DSpace, the SWORD support in DSpace is not sophisticated enough to handle Dryad’s data model. Specifically, there is no way to submit a SWORD package to DSpace that includes multiple objects with structured relationships.

To correct these deficiencies, Dryad has a summer programming project available through the Google Summer of Code. The general aim of the project is to expand the capabilities of the DSpace SWORD module, allowing for objects wrapped in BagIt (https://wiki.ucop.edu/display/Curation/BagIt) packages and containing OAI-ORE (http://www.openarchives.org/ore/) manifests. Although the project is driven by Dryad’s needs, the new results will be broadly applicable within the DSpace community. The project will be developed in a configurable way so it may be included in a future release of DSpace. For more details, see the project description at http://bit.ly/GED8ZX.

If you’re interested, or know someone who is interested, don’t wait! The final application deadline is this Friday (6th April 2012), at 19:00 UTC. Send an initial notification of interest to the phylosoc group (contact information available on the project page). You are highly encouraged to create a draft proposal early this week so potential mentors may give feedback before the final proposal is submitted.

Jan 162012
 

A new paper about repository deposit scenarios has just been published in this month’s D-Lib:

SWORD: Facilitating Deposit Scenarios (http://www.dlib.org/dlib/january12/lewis/01lewis.html / doi:10.1045/january2012-lewis)

The SWORD (Simple Web-service Offering Repository Deposit) protocol was designed to facilitate the interoperable deposit of resources into systems such as repositories. The use of an interoperable standard eases the burden of developing clients to deposit such resources. This paper examines nine different deposit use cases, and provides case studies and examples of each use case to demonstrate the wide range of repository deposit scenarios. The use cases range from the deposit of scholarly communication outputs from a publisher to a repository and the automatic deposit of data from laboratory equipment, to inter-repository transfer and collaborative authoring workflows.

Nine different deposit use cases are examined, along with case studies or examples for each:

  • Use case 1: Publisher to Repository
  • Use case 2: Research Information System to Repository
  • Use case 3: Desktop to Repository
  • Use case 4: Repository to Repository
  • Use case 5: Specialised Deposit User Interface to Repository
  • Use case 6: Conference Submission System to Repository
  • Use case 7: Laboratory equipment to Repository
  • Use case 8: Repository Bulk Ingest
  • Use case 9: Collaborative authoring
Nov 082011
 

As part of the SWORD v2 project finding, resources were allocated to implement it in a number of repository platforms.  First off the block to release SWORD v2 implementations as part of their core functionality are EPrints and DSpace:

There are also client code library implementations available if you wish to create SWORD v2 clients.